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Fruit is being recalled because of Listeria — how concerned should your family be? | Deseret News National
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Al Behrman, Associated Press
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Fruit is being recalled because of Listeria — how concerned should your family be?

Planning on baking a peach pie or whipping up some plum pudding? You may want to think twice about it, because some summer fruits have recently been recalled.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, they have been contaminated by Listeria monocytogenes — a bacteria that causes listeriosis, which can lead to high fever, headaches, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. It’s also been heavily linked to fatal infections in young kids and elderly people, as well as miscarriages and stillbirths for expecting mothers.

Peaches, plums, nectarines and pluots specificially have been recalled. Some of the popular stores affected include Wegman’s, Trader Joe’s, Costco and Walmart, as well as several lots across the country.

“Because we do not know the locations of the companies that purchased the products from our direct customers, the company is issuing a nationwide recall,” Wawona Packing Co. said in a statement.

But it's not just the food itself that's been possibly affected. Other products may be contaminated, too.

“Keep in mind that some of the recalled products include prepared foods, particularly items from Wegman’s, so be wary if you’ve bought any peach pies lately,” Parade wrote. “If you have recalled items, definitely don’t eat them, and go back to the store for a refund.”

So how concerned should your family be?

For the young and the elderly, this is a major concern given that it’s been linked in the past to death. Anyone with a weak immune system should also be on the watch, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But middle-aged adults with healthy immune systems should be fine. The amount of infections that actually end in death are pretty low.

The graphic below highlights how the disease has affected the United States in the past compared to one of the more common foodborne illnesses, E. coli.

And this graph shows the differences specifically between the two illnesses, showing that although there are less deaths for E. coli, there are exceptionally more diagnosed illnesses.

If any questions arise about the sickness, call the Food and Drug Administration at 1-888-232-9912.

Email: hscribner@deseretdigital.com, Twitter: @herbscribner