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Girl masters the art of an apology with friendship bracelets | Deseret News National
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Education

Girl masters the art of an apology with friendship bracelets

Someone posted a picture on Imgur of an apology letter from his or her next door neighbor's daughter. The girl had been throwing stones at their back door just a few days before.

In the letter, the girl writes, "I am truly sorry for throwing stones and rocks at your door. I was acting very stupid, and after you told me off, I heard a baby crying, and I wasn't sure if it was your baby or not. I am really sorry, like really, really sorry, and I hope you can forgive me."

Attached to the letter are three bracelets: one for mom, one for dad and one for the baby.

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Kudos to the parents for teaching their child to recognize her faults and do her best to correct them.

According to Noah Berlatsky of The Atlantic, teaching your children to apologize is a good thing.

"The reason to teach kids to apologize isn't to make the wrong-doer feel better. It's to make the person wronged feel better," writes Berlatsky. "Secondarily, it's to make the wrong-doer feel worse, or at least, to make the wrong-doer understand that he or she has done something wrong and unacceptable."

Forcing your kids to apologize, however, is another story.

Howard J. Bennett, M.D. writes in The Huffington Post that requiring a child to issue an apology may actually make things worse, embarrassing either you or the child and not teaching your kid the proper lesson.

"Although I understand why a parent would push her child to say he's sorry, if it's not a sincere apology, I'm not sure anything will be gained by forcing the issue," he writes. "My recommendation, in this situation, is to model appropriate behavior instead of turning it into a showdown."

Friendship bracelets may strike just the right balance between the two extremes, allowing your child to apologize but in a way that's fun and authentic.

Brittany Binowski is a senior Web producer for Deseret National. You may contact her at bbinowski@deseretdigital.com or tweet her online @binowski.